What is reusable toilet cloth?

A while ago, Tamara wrote a blog post in which she mentioned that she carried around a reusable hanky book to blow her nose and that this grossed everyone around her out. Not to be outdone, I’ve also found a way to reduce my paper consumption that others think is gross and I’m actually fine with.

This article is about cloth toilet roll, otherwise known as family cloth or reusable toilet roll. If the topic makes you cringe, I (Emma) understand, but I actually found it to be a fairly easy way to massively reduce my paper (and water) consumption and it doesn’t gross me out as much as I thought it would.

I realise that’s hardly a ringing endorsement, but I seriously recommended giving this a go. I started in September when my parents went on holiday, thinking that this would be a short-lived experience, but I actually found it so easy that I never stopped.

But wait, don’t you get like *stuff* on your hands?

No, because the cloths I cut are big enough to cover my hand while I wipe. Plus, they’re more absorbent than paper, so there’s less soak through – if that makes sense.

What did you use for the cloth?

There are a number of online stores that sell cloths or you can make your own by buying fabric, cutting it into squares, and sewing the edges off.
I didn’t want to spend any money though, so I cut up old clothes that would have only gone into rags anyway (i.e. underwear with snapped elastic or socks with holes). An added benefit was that the cloths had been washed enough times that they were soft enough for those delicate areas.
I do recommend sewing up the edges of the fabric though, otherwise, they start to fray and then you have a lot of fibres to remove from the filter. It’s a hassle.

Do you use them all the time?

Most of the time. Obviously, I can’t use them when I’m out of the house, but I’d estimated that I’ve used them 95% of the time when at home. The only times I haven’t have been when I got up in the middle of the night or when the cloths have actually been in the wash.

I keep the cloths in the downstairs toilet because no one else in the house uses it. I have an old plastic washing powder tub that, because it has a lid, serves as the “washing basket”.

How do you wash them?

I followed general guidelines from cloth nappy companies, which was to wash at 60 degrees centigrade, with my regular cleaning products and then line dry. I honestly thought that 60 might be a little low, but baby skin is far more delicate than mine and nappies are designed for longer contact with skin, so what do I know?

These should be washed separately from other clothes/materials to avoid any staining (and because your clothes should be washed at lower temps to keep them in good nick). Full disclosure: I did put cleaning cloths in the load so the drum was full and I did put cloths that had only been used for pee into regular washing loads. It was fine, seriously.

But what about the wasted water when you wash the cloths?

I’m glad you brought that up. If you’re concerned about the potential water waste from washing these cloths to reuse them, it might help you to know that there’s an awful lot of wasted water in the creation of toilet roll! And that because there wasn’t toilet paper in the loo, causing a clog, I was able to flush the loo less.

Okay, well that’s it from me on the topic of reusable toilet roll. Let me know your thoughts in the comments section.