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Tag: water

The Lowdown on Reusable Toilet Cloth

What is reusable toilet cloth?

A while ago, Tamara wrote a blog post in which she mentioned that she carried around a reusable hanky book to blow her nose and that this grossed everyone around her out. Not to be outdone, I’ve also found a way to reduce my paper consumption that others think is gross and I’m actually fine with.

This article is about cloth toilet roll, otherwise known as family cloth or reusable toilet roll. If the topic makes you cringe, I (Emma) understand, but I actually found it to be a fairly easy way to massively reduce my paper (and water) consumption and it doesn’t gross me out as much as I thought it would.

I realise that’s hardly a ringing endorsement, but I seriously recommended giving this a go. I started in September when my parents went on holiday, thinking that this would be a short-lived experience, but I actually found it so easy that I never stopped.

But wait, don’t you get like *stuff* on your hands?

No, because the cloths I cut are big enough to cover my hand while I wipe. Plus, they’re more absorbent than paper, so there’s less soak through – if that makes sense.

What did you use for the cloth?

There are a number of online stores that sell cloths or you can make your own by buying fabric, cutting it into squares, and sewing the edges off.
I didn’t want to spend any money though, so I cut up old clothes that would have only gone into rags anyway (i.e. underwear with snapped elastic or socks with holes). An added benefit was that the cloths had been washed enough times that they were soft enough for those delicate areas.
I do recommend sewing up the edges of the fabric though, otherwise, they start to fray and then you have a lot of fibres to remove from the filter. It’s a hassle.

Do you use them all the time?

Most of the time. Obviously, I can’t use them when I’m out of the house, but I’d estimated that I’ve used them 95% of the time when at home. The only times I haven’t have been when I got up in the middle of the night or when the cloths have actually been in the wash.

I keep the cloths in the downstairs toilet because no one else in the house uses it. I have an old plastic washing powder tub that, because it has a lid, serves as the “washing basket”.

How do you wash them?

I followed general guidelines from cloth nappy companies, which was to wash at 60 degrees centigrade, with my regular cleaning products and then line dry. I honestly thought that 60 might be a little low, but baby skin is far more delicate than mine and nappies are designed for longer contact with skin, so what do I know?

These should be washed separately from other clothes/materials to avoid any staining (and because your clothes should be washed at lower temps to keep them in good nick). Full disclosure: I did put cleaning cloths in the load so the drum was full and I did put cloths that had only been used for pee into regular washing loads. It was fine, seriously.

But what about the wasted water when you wash the cloths?

I’m glad you brought that up. If you’re concerned about the potential water waste from washing these cloths to reuse them, it might help you to know that there’s an awful lot of wasted water in the creation of toilet roll! And that because there wasn’t toilet paper in the loo, causing a clog, I was able to flush the loo less.

Okay, well that’s it from me on the topic of reusable toilet roll. Let me know your thoughts in the comments section.

How to Eco-Hack Your Bathroom

Do you know that the bathroom is often one of the least eco-friendly places in the house? With the average toilet flush using 8 litres of water and even the keenest of recyclers failing to properly dispose of their cardboard toilet rolls, it’s easy to see why.

With that in mind, let Emma tell you about some of the ways that we can make our bathroom greener without resorting to an avocado-coloured suite.

Recycling

Most people- even those who love recycling- only have one bin in their bathroom and everything goes in there; from tissues to shower gel bottles to cardboard toilet tubes. No one wants to go through the bathroom bin to sort the recyclables from the snotty tissues. That’s why I’d propose getting a small bin for recyclable items in your bathroom. For a quick reminder on recyclable items in Portsmouth, check out Tamara’s earlier post.

Waste

There are some who would advocate that the only waste in your bathroom should be… well… your waste (sorry). Although I’m not quite there yet, I wanted to share some nifty little tips for reducing your bathroom’s landfill contributions.

  • Install a bidet: The idea of a bidet is that you cut down intensely on toilet roll usage and there are now many companies who sell bidet attachments for your toilet. For those of you who are concerned about this upping your water usage, it actually takes far more water to create toilet rolls.
  • Cut down on disposables for cleaning: It is far better to use reusable cloths and toilet brushes with eco-friendly cleaning products than single-use items. All you need to do is wash them afterwards.

Water

 

Water usage is a huge problem in the family bathroom! The average shower uses 35 litres of water, while baths use around 80, and toilets use a third of all water in the home.

How can we tackle this?

  • Reusing water: Greywater is the term for water that is reused instead of going down the drain. Next time you have a bath, save the water and use it to water your plants, wash your car, wash any items that need hand washing, or even flush your loo (I’m not kidding).
  • Turn off the taps: This should be obvious but don’t leave your taps running while you’re brushing your teeth- it wastes 6 litres of water per minute.
  • Flush less: I’m not advocating that you take on the ‘if it’s brown, flush it down; if it’s yellow, let it mellow’ mantra (although I’d support you). However, we can cut down on our water usage for the toilet by installing a dual-flush toilet or converting your existing one into a low-flush toilet using one plastic bottle.

 

So those are some of my favourite eco hacks for the bathroom. What did you think about them? Do you have any more that you can share?

Let me know in the comments below.

 

3 Common Green Goofs and How to Fix Them

This series of blogs is entitled, “It’s easy being green” but sometimes it’s just as easy to mess up. Everyone makes mistakes and we can either beat ourselves up over it or we can work to reduce the problem.

In this blog, I (Emma) will explain how we can turn these trip-ups into triumphs.

1. Accidently Taking a Plastic Bag

While I’m sure that everyone reading keeps a stockpile of reusable bags in their car and has at least one in their purse/backpack, there are always times when we trip up.

Sometimes you’ll already be on your way to a barbeque or a dinner party when the host texts and ask you to pick something up at the last minute and you don’t have a canvas bag or you’ve been to Subway and you were so caught up choosing which cookie to have that you forgot to say “I don’t need a bag, thanks”.

So what can you do?
· Reuse the bag but if you’re already overflowing with reusable bags you probably don’t want to
· Donate it to a friend that doesn’t have an outstanding reusable bag collection
· Donate it to your local charity shop, as smaller causes don’t have the money to create their own
· You can also recycle used and broken carrier bags at most supermarkets

2. You bought bottled water

 

I know, I know.

You were in a rush when you left the house and your reusable bottle is still on the table. If you go back, you’ll be late for work but you can’t go without water until you get back. You’ll just have to stop into a shop on the way and grab a bottle.

Now you could reuse it but you already have a metal bottle and you’ve been scared by some of the unsubstantiated cancer claims on the internet. Regardless, you don’t want to just recycle it. What can you do?

DIY Water Filter

A Stiff Broom

Scooper

3. You ordered take-out and you’re worried about how to recycle the containers

 

I am as lazy as you and I love take-out; all kinds. But the packaging, oh no.

I’m eternally grateful that Portsmouth City Council will take chip-shop paper and pizza boxes as long as you don’t leave any food remnants on the packing (I have never left remnants of take-out in my entire life).

If you are a little worried about melted cheese on your paper and cardboard, then you can compost the -tear it up first or it will take ages to degrade; you can even soak it in a little water to speed up the process.

 

No compost bin? Not even at your local dump? You could offer it to local gardeners on Facebook. It helps to keep weeds down.

If all else fails, tear the top of the box off; it’s usually less greasy and can still be recycled. It at least cuts down on the waste.

If you have plastic boxes from your Chinese take-out, then they unfortunately cannot be recycled at the kerbside. Once you’ve washed them out, you can reuse them as lunchboxes and craft storage or if you order Chinese food as much as I do, you can recycle them at your local Sainsburys.

I hope that this has solved some of your common sustainability slip ups Have you got any other eco mistakes that you’d like help solving? Let me know in the comments below and we’ll try to answer your problems in a future blog.

This post was inspired by a post on my personal blog.

 

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